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strelwidhan

introduction  | pronunciation  | grammar  | vocabulary  | examples

This is a brief account of the salient points of the grammar of Strelwidhan. There is an accompanying page of example sentences which illustrate some of these points.

word order

Word order is not fixed, but commonly has the following pattern:

Subject - Object - Indirect Object - Verb - Adverb

Adjectives follow their associated noun.

plurals

Plurals are formed by mutation of the dominant vowel or dipthong.

[PLURAL]:
{
 ((..a.. ) > (..ae..))
 ((..e.. OR ..el..) > (..eg..))
 ((..i.. OR ..aw..) > (..y..))
 ((..o..) > (..ou..))
 ((..u..) > (..wy..))
 ((..ea..) > (..eoi..))
}

noun declensions

First declension - nouns ending in -ec.

Second declension - nouns with other consonant endings.

In all declensions, genitives are indicated by the nominative and a prefixed y- or suffixed possessive pronoun.

adjective declensions

First declension - adjectives ending in -a.

Where an adjective is attached to a noun in the genitive case, the nominative adjective is used, and the adjective immediately follows its associated noun.

pronouns

Person Sing. Pl.
I-sy, -sys-dhy, -dhys
you-su, -sus-dhu, -dhus
he, him-se, -ses-dhe, -dhes
she, her-sa, -sas-dha, -dhas
it-so, -sos-dho, -dhos

possessive pronouns

Person Sing. Pl.
my, mine-ysy, -ysys-ydhy, -ydhys
your, yours-ysu, -ysus-ydhu, -ydhus
his-yse, -yses-ydhe, -ydhes
her, hers-ysa, -ysas-ydha, -ydhas
its-yso, -ysos-ydho, -ydhos

There is also a neutral possessive, -yn, which can be used if the person to which it applies is already referred to in the sentence.

For example:

ghalwec-ysy enste-so. This is my home.

i-cestec ghalwec-yn enste-so This is the man's home [lit. the man his home it is].

verb suffixes

strelwe-sy I speak, I am speaking.

strelwyde-sy I spoke, I was speaking.

Note that the verb commonly (though not necessarily) comes at the end of the sentence or phrase.

i-cestec strelwyde-se the man spoke.

i-castec aen ghalwec-yn strelwyde-sa the woman spoke [or was speaking] of her home.

a-cestec strelwyde-sy I spoke to the man.